Accessibility Tools

IIH

  • A rare brain condition was not "all in her head"

    The whooshing in Charisse Moratelli’s head wouldn’t stop. She tried to explain it to others, this noise inside her ear that seemed to coincide with her heartbeat. It was constant, it was maddening and it was getting worse.

  • All smiles again, without the headaches

    Elementary school teacher Michelle Rizzo is used to putting on a show. “You have to be all smiles for the sake of the kids,” said the 28-year-old, who lives in Ronkonkoma, NY. But for her, smiling had been tough to come by for more than a year. She suffered frequent headaches that Tylenol couldn’t touch, as well as odd pressure in her head that made her hear her heartbeat in her ears.

  • A Patient's Story: A Real Solution to a Pseudotumor

    I suffered from headaches all throughout my twenties, and I had always thought they were migraines. The headaches got much worse when I was pregnant — they affected my vision and I would actually lose my vision briefly (but entirely) several times a day. It was scary!

  • A Patient's Story: Connecting the Dots

    When this California biologist realized that his terrible headaches might be related to recent changes in his vision, the connection led him to Dr. Patsalides — and a cure for both of his problems.

  • It Was Time to Do Something

    South Carolina physical therapist Shannon Johnson, 38, woke up one summer night to find that the vision from her left eye had mysteriously dimmed. "It looked like the lights were turned off in my left eye and on in my right," she says.

  • He Gave Me a Second Chance at Life

    Nicole Scherer of Bellmore, New York, was 25 years old and eager to start her career as a newly minted lawyer. Other than the occasional migraine, she was doing fine — and much like the other 3 million Americans who suffer from migraines, she attributed them to something benign: sinus problems, low blood sugar, dehydration, or her diet. At first she tried to ease her migraines by hydrating herself more and changing her diet, but her efforts were for naught; not only did the migraines keep coming, but her condition started to become more perilous.

  • I Was Ready Not to Be a Lost Cause

    Cali Halperin was just 16 years old during the summer of 2016, when she got a headache that wouldn’t go away. A normally healthy and active high school student from New York City, she didn’t know what to do about it except take ibuprofen and hope it would get better. But it didn’t. "I woke up with it every morning and went to bed with it every night," she recalls. "It was especially painful behind my eyes."

Pulsatile Tinnitus

  • A Patient's Story: Pulsatile Tinnitus, Solved

    The whooshing sound in her ears was maddening, but nobody could find a solution for it. Then Kate met Dr. Patsalides, who had the answer.

    Kate Metzler, a 32-year-old behavioral therapist from Kingston, New York, will never forget the frustrating year she spent seeing doctors, having medical tests, and trying get to the bottom of her mysterious and debilitating symptoms — only to finally find relief at the Weill Cornell Medicine Brain and Spine Center.

  • I Am So Grateful for the Silence

    When Maryanne Pratt of Ossining, New York, first noticed the faint pulsing sound in her right ear, she figured it was a sinus problem and didn’t think much about it. But over the next few weeks the sound became more intense and she started getting headaches too. One day as she bent down to put harnesses on her dogs, the pulsing sound became so loud it was like a revving car engine.

  • The Best Happy Ending

    It was ten years ago when Rosanne Miller, a 64-year-old legal assistant from Brooklyn, New York, started to hear a whooshing noise in her ear. She had just returned from a trip and assumed the sound was part of the "ear-popping" sensation many travelers experience. "I attributed it to flying and thought it would go away, but it continued 24/7," she remembers. The whooshing was a constant presence in her life for a decade — until she met Dr. Athos Patsalides and underwent the venous sinus stenting procedure he has pioneered here in the United States.